The End of Night

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Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light A book about much more than just light pollution.

The End of Night from Hachette Book Group.

Paul Bogard’s The End of Night is one of those genre-bending books that nearly defies categorization. While Amazon places it in the Science & Math category, it . . . → Read More: The End of Night

Turing’s Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe

 

It has been mentioned in virtually every review of this book – the title is slightly misleading. The book is not really about computer scientist Alan Turing at all. Its central character is John von Neumann, a brilliant mathematician who was able to bridge the gap between math and physics in the mid-20th century . . . → Read More: Turing’s Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe

Godel, Escher, Bach: A strange, Strange Loop of a book

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Douglas Hofstadter’s Pullitzer-winning 1979 novel-tangled-up-in-a-science-book is a strange, illuminating and utterly brilliant work of art which also happens to be extremely difficult to read. (Is that a paradox?)

Godel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid is sprawling, ambitious, and very atypical as far as books go. It tells so many stories, argues in so many . . . → Read More: Godel, Escher, Bach: A strange, Strange Loop of a book

Public Parts “Book” Review

Public Parts Cover

In this non-book, Jeff Jarvis, journalism professor, author (What Would Google Do?), and Tweeter/blogger/Google+’er extraordinaire, attempts to navigate the increasingly murky waters dividing our public and private lives. I call it a non-book in the McLuhan sense, in that the book is far from traditional. It has no numbered chapters, contains quotes from Twitter users . . . → Read More: Public Parts “Book” Review

Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything

I recently read a fun little book called Moonwalking With Einstein by Joshua Foer, who I just researched and realized is the younger brother of writer Jonathan Safran Foer (Everything is Illuminated, Eating Animals, and more). Despite its title, the book is not about Michael Jackson’s trademark dance move, nor Albert Einstein. The subtitle, . . . → Read More: Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything